Monday, October 19

Tag: U.S. Census Bureau

Global Immigration to the Bay Area at 5-Year High
Demographics

Global Immigration to the Bay Area at 5-Year High

By Sharon Simonson International migrants are pouring into the Bay Area at the highest rate in five years, driving population growth and cultural change across the region. More than 238,000 foreign-born people and some Americans returning from abroad moved into Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa and Alameda counties in the last five years — more than 92,000 came to Santa Clara County alone, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates released today. All five counties have seen their highest rates of international migration since 2010 in the last two years. People coming from overseas or outside the United States accounted for two-thirds of the population growth in both San Francisco and Santa Clara counties from mid-2010 to mid-2015. They represen...
Census Bureau: English Not Required
Demographics, The Web

Census Bureau: English Not Required

More than half of the San Jose metro doesn't speak English at home; 370,000 residents aged 5 and older don't speak English By Sharon Simonson More than 2.5 million residents of the San Francisco Bay Area speak a language other than English at home, a vastly greater proportion of the region’s 5.9 million residents than in the nation at large, according to new U.S. Census Bureau research. More than a million Bay Area residents also say they don’t speak English very well. The data, which encompasses the U.S. population age 5 and older, is among the most comprehensive the Census Bureau has ever published on languages spoken in the United States. The research found that 60.4 million U.S. residents, or 21 percent of the 291 million people age 5 and older, speak one of at least 350 langu...
Census Bureau: U.S. Startups Aren’t Creating Jobs Like They Used To
The Web

Census Bureau: U.S. Startups Aren’t Creating Jobs Like They Used To

U.S. startup companies — those founded within a given calendar year — aren’t creating jobs at the pace that U.S. startups have in the past, according to new Business Dynamics Statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2006, at their pre-recession peak, U.S. startups contributed 3.5 million new jobs compared to 1 million from firms 26 years or older. In 2013, the older companies again produced 1 million new jobs for the first time since 2006, but startup companies produced only 2.3 million. California startups produced more new jobs than startups nationally on average.         //