Sunday, August 1

Tag: Pew Research Center

Pew: Foreign Students Migrate to Bay Area
Demographics

Pew: Foreign Students Migrate to Bay Area

By Sharon Simonson Not wildfires, mudslides, or monster commutes; not overcrowded and expensive housing, or gender-challenged workplaces. Nothing—so far—can keep them away: foreign students seeking U.S. college degrees and work experience have flocked to the Bay Area in recent years—more than to any other place in the country except New York City. According to new research from the Pew Research Center based on more than a decade of student-visa data, the Silicon Valley and San Francisco metros rank among the top ten destinations for foreign students earning American university degrees and staying to work.  Including the more than 77,000 foreign students who migrated to the region for employment after earning degrees in other U.S. cities, the Bay Area attracted more than 120,000 foreig...
Pew Research: Bay Area Economics: Poor Get Poorer; Middle Class Shrinks
Demographics

Pew Research: Bay Area Economics: Poor Get Poorer; Middle Class Shrinks

Median incomes have fallen for everyone, but they’ve fallen most for the lowest income households. New research finds that income inequality suppresses economic growth. By Sharon Simonson  The middle-class is shrinking in hundreds of U.S. cities including the San Francisco-Oakland and San Jose-Sunnyvale metro areas, according to new Pew Research Center analysis encompassing three-quarters of the American population. In the Bay Area metros, not only is the middle class shrinking but fewer than half of adults now live in middle-class households, a change in conditions from five years ago. In addition, while more Bay Area adults joined the upper-income ranks, helping reduce the size of the middle class, median household incomes fell. The decline was greatest for lower-income house...
Deconstructing Dia de los Muertos
Demographics, Events

Deconstructing Dia de los Muertos

Lara Medina, an expert on Chicano and indigenous American religious practices and spirituality, explains the history of Mesoamerica’s Dia de los Muertos and talks about living the nepantla life and the creativity that blurry boundaries produce. By Sharon Simonson Don’t call Dia de los Muertos the Mexican Halloween, begs Lara Medina. The 62-year-old autora y professora of Chicano and Chicana religious history at California State University, Northridge, has watched and studied the holiday and its U.S. incarnation since the early 1970s when visiting Mexican artists traveling in Los Angeles and San Francisco staged small-scale celebrations as a solace to the deaths of the Vietnam War. What began as a sacred pre-Colombian familial observance by Mesoamericans has evolved into its c...
Pew Research: Immigration to U.S. Is Slowing
The Web

Pew Research: Immigration to U.S. Is Slowing

At the 50-year mark, the Pew Research Center has produced a 100-year history and projection of U.S. immigration, beginning with the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act and ending 50 years from now in 2065. The U.S. foreign-born population has gone from less than 10 million people 50 years ago to nearly 45 million people today and is projected to continue to rise sharply in the next 50 years to 78 million people. Hispanics as a share of the nation's foreign-born grew from 14 percent in 1965 to 48 percent in 2005. Their proportion is now falling, even as the proportion of Asians rises. In 2055, Pew projects that 36 percent of the nation's foreign-born will be Asian and 34 percent Hispanic. The number of new immigrants coming to the U.S. peaked at eight million arriving from 2000 throu...