Thursday, June 24

Tag: Oakland

Milpitas, Tracy Lead Bay Area Population Growth
Demographics, Events

Milpitas, Tracy Lead Bay Area Population Growth

In a top 20 list dominated by cities in Texas and Arizona, the Bay Area’s Milpitas makes a brave showing at 15th in a new U.S. Census Bureau ranking of the fastest-growing incorporated places in the country with more than 50,000 people.  The new Milpitas Transit Center connects the city to the region. It is the only Bay Area city to appear within the fastest-growing cohort.  Situated to San Jose’s north and east, the town, whose name means “little cornfields” in Spanish, grew 5 percent from mid-2018 to the middle of last year, reaching not quite 85,000 residents. That's slightly less than its rate of growth in 2014-15, when Milpitas also made a Census Bureau list of fast-growing U.S. cities. Its most current rate of growth compares to a 12 percent growth rate for th...
East Bay Boom-o-rama; Silicon Valley Slip
Demographics

East Bay Boom-o-rama; Silicon Valley Slip

Has the pendulum swung? East Bay suburbs are leading national population growth even as traditionally prestigious Silicon Valley residential enclaves are struggling to keep residents. By Sharon Simonson Milpitas and Dublin each added more than 5 percent to their populations in the last year alone. Their East Bay neighbors Emeryville, Fremont and the far East Bay’s Brentwood are also growing fast. Fremont has added more than 18,000 people since 2010, reaching 232,000 residents in total. But in what might be an ominous sign, a string of Silicon Valley’s most remote and expensive western suburbs are seeing their populations plateau and even begin to decline. According to just-released U.S. Census figures, more people left Palo Alto last year than moved in, and the same was true in Campbell, ...
Berkeley Workers Bike More Than Anyone Else
Demographics, The Web

Berkeley Workers Bike More Than Anyone Else

By Sharon Simonson A greater proportion of people bike to work in Berkeley than in any other American city with a population of 100,000 or more, according to new calculations from the U.S. Census Bureau. Work commuters in San Francisco and Oakland are also among the most likely to turn to pedal power compared to their peers in other large American cities. To commemorate Bike to Work Week from May 16 to May 20, the bureau ranked the top 20 U.S. cities based on what percentage of their workforce ride a bike to work. Not quite one in 10 Berkeley workers ride bicycles to their jobs. That compares to about 5 percent of workers in San Francisco and slightly less in the East Bay’s Oakland. No South Bay city made the Top 20 list. College towns appear most prominently in the ranking...
Global Immigration to the Bay Area at 5-Year High
Demographics

Global Immigration to the Bay Area at 5-Year High

By Sharon Simonson International migrants are pouring into the Bay Area at the highest rate in five years, driving population growth and cultural change across the region. More than 238,000 foreign-born people and some Americans returning from abroad moved into Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa and Alameda counties in the last five years — more than 92,000 came to Santa Clara County alone, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates released today. All five counties have seen their highest rates of international migration since 2010 in the last two years. People coming from overseas or outside the United States accounted for two-thirds of the population growth in both San Francisco and Santa Clara counties from mid-2010 to mid-2015. They represen...
Hatching Future Hipsters: Millennials A Tough Act to Follow
Demographics

Hatching Future Hipsters: Millennials A Tough Act to Follow

U.S. metros vie for a smaller youth population; will millennials ever marry and have kids? The post-millennial generation — the nation's youngest — is smaller than its predecessor, leaving most of the nation's large metros with a shrinking population under age 20. The Bay Area's youngest cohort is growing but not fast. By Sharon Simonson The post-millennial generation is less numerous than the millennials. Even with immigration, in coming years, U.S. metropolitan areas will share a smaller youth-pie, according to research by demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institute: "There are places that will have growth in younger populations, but they will be not the norm," Frey said. Fifty-nine of the country's100 largest metropolitan areas saw a shrinking number of children fr...
Brookings: San Francisco, Oakland Among U.S. Cities Gaining White Population After Decades of Loss
Demographics

Brookings: San Francisco, Oakland Among U.S. Cities Gaining White Population After Decades of Loss

By Sharon Simonson Whites are returning to America’s cities including San Francisco and Oakland, reversing what had become persistent outmigration. In the two decades from 1990 to 2010, America’s 50 largest cities experienced a net loss of more than two million people who identified themselves as white, according to the new findings from The Brookings Institution’s William Frey based on U.S. Census Bureau data. In the first four years of the current decade, the same 50 cities experienced a net gain of nearly 500,000 white people. Young adults aged 25- to 34-years-old and their young children are leading the shift, along with older adults aged 55 to 74, Frey found. “The impetus for this change is undoubtedly related to the post 2010 revival of big city growth that has been d...