Demographics

Vital Valley, Struggling Valley
Demographics

Vital Valley, Struggling Valley

By Sharon Simonson SAN JOSE and PALO ALTO—As San Francisco and Silicon Valley lead California job growth, Bay Area economic recovery remains irregular. San Francisco and the South Bay have regained their 2007 peak employment—but not their dot-com peaks—while the East Bay, Oakland and Marin County have only begun to recover from the financial crisis, according to Palo Alto’s Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy and state data. Thirteen years after the dot-com boom, at not quite $91,000 a year, Santa Clara County’s median household income remained 11 percent below what it was in 1999, while 7 percent fewer households, or more than 12,000, earned above $150,000 a year, according to the most current Census Bureau data. San Francisco has 13,000 fewer employed residents toda...
Historic Burbank Positioned for Change
Culture, Demographics

Historic Burbank Positioned for Change

By Sharon Simonson BURBANK, Unincorporated Santa Clara County — What’s in a number? Not everything, said 35-year-old Shirley Chan, who purchased her Burbank neighborhood home near West San Carlos Street and Bascom Avenue in 2011. The boundaries for the Burbank Community Association, which Chan leads, encompass neighborhoods that have some of the lowest median household incomes in Santa Clara County. But Chan grew up in West San Jose and attended the neighborhood’s Luther Burbank School. As leader of her neighborhood’s association, she is working to drive its gentrification. “I moved to Burbank because I think there is a lot of opportunity, and I want to tap into that,” she said. Chan cites proximity to downtown San Jose; Mineta San Jose International Airport; Westfield Valley ...
Census 2020 Seeks to Unravel Race from Ethnicity
Demographics

Census 2020 Seeks to Unravel Race from Ethnicity

By Sharon Simonson Tech companies releasing demographic data about their workforces are entering an emerging and potentially fraught conversation, though perhaps not at all about what they imagine. Since the end of May, Silicon Valley’s Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., LinkedIn Corp. and Menlo Park’s Facebook Inc. have released “diversity” counts by gender, race and ethnicity about their national and global workers. They have uniformly criticized themselves for their largely white and Asian male populations and pledged to broaden their human spectrum. But in their information releases — in particular their graphical representations of their workforces’ statistical makeup — the companies have used nomenclature that differs from that used by the federal government, conflating two histor...